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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - Barron's Booknotes
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CHAPTER 26

- A new element creeps into the book here: helpless terror. In
his dream Lockwood was frightened by the ghost, but he
was able to keep it from getting in. Edgar trembled when
confronted with an angry Heathcliff, but that did not stop
Edgar from striking him. Linton can do nothing. When
Cathy and Ellen meet him on the moors, he tries to appear
well and cheerful, but his eyes wander fearfully toward
Wuthering Heights. His terror has silenced even his
complaints. Before he provoked, now he is only pitiable.



(Note that it is only Linton, the most tedious character in
the book, who shows this abject fear. Emily Bronte thinks
highly of courage.) As for Heathcliff, his behavior
continues to get worse.

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Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - Barron's Booknotes
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