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Free Study Guide-Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne-Free Synopsis
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CHAPTER SUMMARY AND NOTES

CHAPTER 14

Summary

The rash exploit had been accomplished; and for an hour Passepartout laughed gaily at his success. Sir Francis pressed the worthy fellow’s hand, and Fogg said, "Well done!" which, from him, was high commendation; to which Passepartout replied that all the credit of the affair belonged to Mr. Fogg. Meanwhile, the lady reposed in a howdah on the elephant. The elephant was advancing rapidly through the still dark forest, and, an hour after leaving the pagoda had crossed a vast plain. Sir Francis was not worried about the effects of intoxication on Aouda, which he knew would subsequently subside but he was more disturbed at the prospect of her future fate. He told Phileas Fogg that, should Aouda remain in India, she would inevitably fall again into the hands of her executioners and that it would be better to get her out of the country. Phileas Fogg replied that he would reflect upon the matter. The station at Allahabad was reached about ten o’clock, and, the interrupted line of railway being resumed, would enable them to reach Calcutta in less than twenty-four hours.

While the young woman waited at the station, Passepartout was charged with purchasing for her various articles of toilet, for which his master gave him unlimited credit. Passepartout made it a point, as he made his purchases, to take a good look at the city. The sacred city of Allahabad is described. By the time Passepartout returns to Aouda, the influence to which the priests of Pillaji had subjected Aouda began gradually to yield, and she became more herself, so that her fine eyes resumed all their soft Indian expression. It is enough to say, without applying poetical rhapsody to Aouda, that she was a charming woman, in all the European acceptation of the phrase. She spoke English with great purity, and the guide had not exaggerated in saying that the young Parsee had been transformed by her bringing up.


The train was about to start from Allahabad, and Mr. Fogg proceeded to pay the guide, the price agreed upon for his service. The guide had, indeed, risked his life in the adventure at Pillaji, and, if the Indians should catch him afterwards, he would with difficulty escape their vengeance. Phileas Fogg had already determined the answer to the question of how to dispose off Kiouni, the elephant. He asks the Parsee whether he would like to keep the elephant. Passepartout encourages the giving of the elephant to the worthy guide, who is very happy. Soon after, Phileas Fogg, Sir Francis Cromarty, and Passepartout, installed in a carriage with Aouda, who had the best seat, were whirling at full speed towards Benares. During the journey, the young woman fully recovered her senses. Her companions revived her with a little liquor, and then Sir Francis narrated to her what had passed, dwelling upon the courage with which Phileas Fogg had not hesitated to risk his life to save her, and recounting the happy sequel of the venture, the result of Passepartout’s rash idea. Aouda pathetically thanked her deliverers, her fine eyes interpreted her gratitude better than her lips. Fogg reassures her fears of the natives by offering to take her to Hong Kong where she has a relative too.

At Benares, Sir Francis gets off after bidding a warm farewell to his companions.

The areas that they are passing through are described beautifully by the author. The panorama passed before their eyes like a flash, save when the steam concealed it fitfully from the view. Calcutta was reached at seven in the morning, and they left for Hong Kong at noon; so that Phileas Fogg had five hours before him. According to his journal, he was due at Calcutta on the 25 th of October, and that was the exact date of his actual arrival. He was therefore neither behind-hand nor ahead of time. The two days gained between London and Bombay had been lost in the journey across India. But it is not to be supposed that Phileas Fogg regretted them.

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