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MonkeyNotes-As You Like It by William Shakespeare
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Duke Frederick

Duke Frederick, the younger brother of Duke Senior, is a villainous man and one of the antagonists of the play. By usurping the ducal rights of his elder brother, he becomes a symbol of disorder, hatred, and hostility. He is also mainly responsible for driving the main characters into the forest of Arden, for he banishes both Duke Senior and Rosalind there. Towards the end of the play a sudden conversion takes place in him because of his encounter with a religious man. Although the sudden conversion seems a bit trite, it allows Shakespeare to create a happy ending for all the key characters, including Duke Frederick and Duke Senior.

Oliver

Oliver, the jealous older brother of Orlando, is another antagonist of the play. He deprives Orlando of the inheritance from his father and denies him the education that would make him a gentleman. In fact, he is so greedy and so jealous that he even tries to have Orlando killed. He instructs Charles to break his neck during the wrestling match. Oliver's attitude towards his brother changes when Orlando risks his own life to save Oliver from the lioness. Oliver begs for forgiveness, and the kind Orlando obliges. Oliver is further softened when he falls in love with Aliena. Wanting to marry her and stay in the forest, he promises to give his property and fortune to Orlando. At the end of the play, the two brothers are again united in familial love.

Touchstone

Although Touchstone is the court fool, he plays a very important part in the play. When asked by the girls, he eagerly accompanies Rosalind and Celia into exile. Amidst the freedom of the Forest of Arden, he is able to constantly display his wit, bringing a great deal of humor into the play. Although he originally gripes about his deprivations in the forest and longs to return to court, he changes his mind when he meets Audrey. Driven by sexual fantasies, Touchstone feels he is in love and decides he should marry Audrey. He tells her, "We must be married or we must live in bawdy." Touchstone justifies his choice of a wife to Duke Senior by saying, "An ill-favored thing, Sir, but mine own." By the end of the play, Touchstone has truly emerged as the classic fool.

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MonkeyNotes-As You Like It by William Shakespeare
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