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MonkeyNotes-The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
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SCIENTIFIC ACHIEVEMENTS

Franklin discusses his scientific and philosophical contributions. He is introduced to Dr. Spence's electrical experiments when he is in Boston around 1746. Meanwhile, Colinson, a London scientist, sends some glass tubes for such experiments to the Philadelphia Library Company. Franklin soon takes the opportunity to repeat the experiment and tries performing some new and different ones. Franklin writes his findings from the experiments, but the papers on his electrical experiments are largely ignored and sometimes ridiculed. Franklin makes no attempt to defend his work for he feels his experiments are clearly described, and his findings can be easily verified. Franklin's experiment suggesting how to draw lightening from the clouds is successfully performed in France. This success makes his scientific papers more famous, and the Royal Society of London pays particular notice of them. The Royal Society then makes Franklin a member and exempts him from yearly dues. In 1953, the Society honors him with the gold medal of Sir Godfrey Copley.

Notes

In this section, Franklin's scientific achievements are highlighted. His experiments with lightning rods are particularly noticed. His scientific achievements while contributing to the betterment of people, also boost his fame and his political career. He is honored with a gold medal from the Royal Society of London.

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