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MonkeyNotes-The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
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FRANKLIN'S STYLE

Franklin's admiration towards Addison has a direct bearing on Franklin's style of writing. Franklin uses clear and lucid prose and a simple style in conveying his message. The book is also filled with rhetorical language. In the narrative, Franklin speaks not in the style of high fashion but in a colloquial manner; however, he avoids a tone of familiarity. His usual tone is didactic and authoritative, in the manner of a patriarch speaking to posterity, to the younger generations. Franklin attempts to subtly present himself as a role model.

Franklin keeps the narrative in control, while controlling the reader's perspectives. It is obvious that he works both as the narrator and the writer. While composing the narrative, Franklin uses the first person point of view to detail the events and experiences that has made him what he is. Franklin creates an appropriate distance between the narrator and the writer that enables the narrative to be objective in tone.

Franklin appropriates the language of his times to bridge the gap between his role as a prophet and the audience for whom he is writing. Although the narrative is personal, Franklin assumes the role of a historian as he records and reports the events and implications surrounding his life in eighteenth century America.

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