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Free Study Guide-Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin-Free Booknotes
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OCTOBER 29, 1959

Summary

The author discusses his plan with an old friend, the owner of a Negro magazine, Sepia, who is a unique person. Griffin asks him to finance this experiment and in return he will give him some articles or some chapters from the book he will write. He also discusses his plan with the lady editor of the magazine. Both warn him against the dangers of the project, but Griffin is not deterred. Finally he discusses his idea with his wife who though shocked and startled at first, later readily agrees to cooperate. He later goes back to his barn office and as he sits there alone, he suddenly experiences an acute feeling of dread.

Notes

In this part of the diary, the reader meets George Levitan, the owner of Sepia, an international Negro magazine, who is also a unique character for that time and age, as he offers equal job opportunities to whites or Negroes, choosing only according to their qualifications and capabilities. George finds the authorís plan a crazy idea and tells him that heíll get himself killed. But later his sense of justice gets the better of him and he enthusiastically agrees to fund the authorís idea. He then suggests that the author also meet the editor of Sepia, Mrs. Adele Jackson, before embarking on his plans. She is an exceptional and distinguished lady editor, who also is rightly apprehensive about the authorís idea and considers it frightening, as he will become the target of hate groups and even decent whites will be afraid to show him courtesy. But in spite of all their warnings, the author still remains steadfast in his historic decision to become a Negro.


Finally the readers are introduced to Griffinís wife, who, though shocked at first, subsequently agrees to look after their three children, single handedly, in his absence; A very brave and courageous act for a white woman at that time of Negro hate and hostility.

Finally in this dayís entry one senses the authorís very vivid and moving description of the still, silent night. The nature around him is very symbolic of the loneliness and the terrible dread the author is feeling inside, regarding his momentous decision.

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Free Study Guide-Black Like Me by John Howard Griffin-Free Booknotes
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