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Free Study Guide-Brave New World by Aldous Huxley-Free Booknotes
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AUTHOR'S STYLE

The style of Brave New World is typical of Huxley; it is complex and highly wrought, but it is still readable, even if not entertaining. The narrative is, however, constantly enlivened by sophisticated dialogue, constant irony and occasional humor. Inventive ingenuity adds sparkle to the novel that is already punctuated with satire, as seen in the nursery rhymes modified to suit this "odorless, hygienic" world. Huxley also uses the familiar to represent the unfamiliar, as seen in the hypnop'dic proverb: A grammar in time saves nine.


Basically written out of social concern, Huxley's own ideas and attitudes emerge throughout the novel, in both the characters of the Savage and the Controller. He clearly sees good and bad in both of them. He is most troubled, however, that the two of them can find no common meeting ground or acceptance of the other's ideas. As a result, Huxley sees no light at the end of the tunnel for the old order; as a result, John commits suicide and the final picture seems to be a choice between the devil and the deep, dark sea. Although the novel belongs to the genre of utopian novels, popular at the time, Huxley presents an anti-utopia rather than creating an ideal world in which to live.

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