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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
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Scene 4 Summary

Scene 4 begins with Cyrano standing his ground against the audience, which is loudly insisting that Montfleury should not stop his performance. Cyrano threatens to draw his sword and fight anyone in the audience who dares to challenge him. He then insults the actor and chases him off the stage. Next Cyrano criticizes the dramatist, Baro, for his worthless writing. When the intellectually pretentious women in the audience protest his actions, Cyrano compliments them as subjects of literature but implores them not to judge it.

Bellerose, the manager of the theater, confronts Cyrano and tells him that the money of the patrons will have to be refunded if the play is cancelled. Cyrano hands over his purse, which if filled with gold, and tells him to pay the patrons. The audience is then told to leave. An obnoxious man comes up to Cyrano and warns him that Montfleury and his key patron have been greatly insulted and will want revenge. When the man continues and will not leave in spite of Cyrano's insistence, he quarrels with him and kicks him out. Count De Guiche calls upon his followers to silence Cyrano.


Valvert approaches Cyrano and dares to comment on the size of his nose. Cyrano responds by giving a witty exposition on noses and imagining what all sorts of people might say about the size of his nose. Valvert, feeling he has been put down by Cyrano, tries to insult his clothing. Cyrano retorts by explaining that his morals are impeccable even if his clothing is not. Valvert, failing to gain the upper hand, becomes more aggressively rude. Cyrano reacts with wit. When he is called a buffoon, however, Cyrano draws his sword to fight Valvert. He claims that he will fight the duel while he is composing a ballad, which he will recite as he fences. The two draw their swords and begin fighting to the verses of Cyrano's witty poem. By the ballad's refrain, Cyrano lunges and strikes Valvert, making him stagger. As Valvert is led away, the audience applauds Cyrano for his performance; they then depart the theater. After the patrons have left, Cyrano confesses that he has no money to buy dinner. When his friend, Le Bret, rebukes him for giving away his whole month's income to the theatre, he claims that it was a noble and worthwhile gesture. When the refreshment waitress offers him food, he takes a token bite and courteously and grandiosely thanks her.

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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

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