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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
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Scene 4 Summary

Several poets arrive at the bakery. They are talking about the fight that took place at the Porte de Nesle. During the fight, eight people were wounded by a single swordsman, whose identity is unknown. Cyrano pays the poets little attention. He is completely absorbed in writing his love letter and thinking about his meeting with Roxane. He can hardly believe that he is actually going to meet with her and constantly asks what time it is, worrying about the nearness of her arrival.

The poets stuff themselves with pastry, for which they do not pay, and encourage Ragueneau to read his Almond Tart recipe in verse. Although he knows he is exploited by the poets, Ragueneau enjoys their company and tries to accommodate them.

The moral Cyrano watches the actions of Lise as she flirts with the musketeer and warns her about deceiving Ragueneau. He then signals the baker to drive the poets away from the shop, for it is time for Roxane to arrive.


Notes

This scene helps to develop the character of Cyrano as a moral man. When he sees Lise flirting with a musketeer, he is bothered by her actions; therefore, he interrupts and warns her about deceiving her husband.

Cyrano is also shown as a modest man. Although it was not seen on stage, the audience learns from the poets at Ragueneau's bakery that the fight at Porte de Nesle took place the previous night. They talk about the fact that an unidentified swordsman single handedly wounded eight people during the encounter. Even when he hears the amazed poets speaking about the prowess of the swordsman, the unassuming Cyrano does not let his identity be known.

Cyrano is also portrayed as a nervous man. He is so excited about meeting with Roxane that he can hardly hold still. Worrying about her arrival, he constantly asks about the time. He then signals Ragueneau to drive the poets out of the bakery, for it is almost time for her appearance. Cyrano's nervousness and Ragueneau's recipe in verse both lend humor to the scene.

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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

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