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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
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Scene 7 and 8 Summary

Ragueneau and the poets return. Since they have learned that Cyrano was the brave swordsman at the Porte de Nesle, one of the poets wants to write a verse about Cyrano's feat; Cyrano, however, is not interested. Immediately after them enter a group of men from Cyrano's regiment, led by Captain Carbon de Castel Jaloux. They have come to congratulate Cyrano for his heroic fight against one hundred men. Le Bret then announces that a large Parisian crowd has also come out to applaud his deed, and a reporter wants to interview him. Cyrano, however, receives them all coolly. When Le Bret asks his friend about the meeting with Roxane, Cyrano responds by telling him to be quiet.

De Guiche arrives and offers Cyrano patronage through Cardinal Richelieu, his rich and powerful uncle. Cyrano is tempted to ask them to support his play, Agrippine, but De Guiche explains that Richelieu always alters a script before he has it produced. Since Cyrano wants no one to touch his play, he refuses the offer of patronage. De Guiche accuses Cyrano of being too proud.

Some of the Cadets enter with the feathered hats of the men Cyrano fought at the Porte de Nesle. The sight of the hats causes Cuigy to laugh, as he comments on the probable frustration of the person who hired the attackers. De Guiche then claims responsibility for the attack. He said he wanted to be rid of Lignière, whom he judges to be a "drunken rhymester." Cyrano then asks De Guiche if he would like to take the hats back to his defeated friends. Feeling insulted, De Guiche warns Cyrano that he is acting like Don Quixote, trying to fight windmills. Cyrano wittily turns the argument on De Guiche, asking him if his men are windmills "who veer with every change of wind". De Guiche warns that the windmills will hurl Cyrano down. Cyrano insists, however, that they will only serve to sweep him up.


When De Guiche leaves in a huff, Le Bret is upset that Cyrano has passed up an opportunity to have a famous patron, while making a powerful and influential man his enemy. Cyrano then rants against the system of patronage, saying he refuses to bow to anyone; he wants to be free and independent, not beholden to an important person. He adds that he enjoys making enemies because he can do it without bowing. Le Bret comments that Cyrano's bitterness has probably been caused by his meeting with Roxane. Cyrano sharply silences him, not wanting to discuss his cousin.

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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

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