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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
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Scenes 3 and 4 Summary

Ragueneau tells Le Bret that Cyrano has had a freak accident. While he was walking outside, a lackey dropped a piece of firewood from an upper window. It hit Cyrano on the head, injuring him seriously. Ragueneau states that after the accident, he had carried Cyrano to his room and found a doctor who would treat him out of charity. Since Cyrano is still unconscious, Ragueneau wants Le Bret to go to him immediately. The two of them rush out without saying a word to Roxane. She assumes that Ragueneau is in serious trouble for them to totally ignore her.

Roxane stands alone in the park admiring the autumn day. Two nuns come out and place a large armchair in anticipation of Cyrano's weekly visit. When she realizes what time it is, Roxane is surprised, for Cyrano is never late. She assumes that a nun at the gate has stopped him to ask him to repent of his sins. Brushing away a dead leaf, she turns to work on her tapestry in order to pass the time. Soon a nun announces Cyrano's arrival.


Notes

Ragueneau tells Le Bret that Cyrano has been injured. In truth, he has been attacked by a cowardly enemy who orders his servant to drop a piece of firewood on Cyrano's head. The historical Cyrano was injured in the same manner; however, he lived nearly a year after his accident. Both of them die in September. The real Cyrano also suffered from abject poverty, like the protagonist of the play.

At the end of scene 4, Cyrano arrives to see Roxane. It is quite in character that the protagonist would not let an injury keep him away from his true love, even though she has greatly changed. She is no longer the sparkling young beauty who married Christian. Now she is the pathetically faithful wife who has grieved over the loss of her husband for too many years. Time has taken away her bright spirits, as seen in scene 3 when she is easily upset because Le Bret does not answer her.

The tapestry on which Roxane stitches is symbolic of her self- absorption. She has turned away from the world to create her own version of reality. It is significant that she brushes a dead leaf off the tapestry, a foreshadowing of the darkness to come.

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MonkeyNotes-Cyrano De Bergerac by Edmond Rostand

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