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MonkeyNotes-Dracula by Bram Stoker
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STYLE

The style of the author is simple, in a narrative manner the story of Dracula unfolds. Stoker is almost autobiographical in context, where he projects himself into all of the major characters of Dracula. His family is thrown into the hued characters of the book and bristles with repression, apprehension of homosexuality, devouring women and rejecting mothers. The style is vastly descriptive especially the physical aspects. His style especially the sexual tension in the scenes not only titillates with its potential for homo-erotic union, but also arouses the characterís hidden wells of sexuality and fantasy, which were earlier unspoken of amongst Victorians.


Stoker exposes the sexual aspect of the book by making the women (the three women vampires) usurp the male prerogative of initiating sex. It shatters the myth that only fallen women can experience ecstasy. The stalking of Lucy violates the taboo on depicting passionate intercourse ending in orgasm. Yet, Stoker does not show real sex, there is no lovemaking. Stokerís genius was to develop a coded eroticism covering it in the supernatural, and then shrug off all social responsibility by obliterating the authorís voice.

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