free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Chapter 49

Almost a year elapses. Oak is officially appointed as bailiff of Bathsheba's farm. The mistress of the farm maintains a certain aloofness and shows little interest in the farm's management. Boldwood too has led the life of a recluse. He also seeks the help of Gabriel to manage his affairs. Bathsheba agrees to this help with great reluctance.

The improvement in Gabriel's fortunes leads to gossip that he has changed; the villagers falsely accuse him of putting on airs. They also complain that he is too frugal in spite of his improved financial means.

Boldwood again hopes to win Bathsheba. From Liddy he elicits the information that her mistress would wait for another six years (seven years after Troy's disappearance) so that no legal hurdle will present itself to her remarrying.


Notes

Boldwood's obsession with Bathsheba has almost become a form of madness. Hardy hints that he must control it or else it will destroy him eventually. Gabriel, on the other hand, exercises patience, restraint, and tolerance. He continues to be devoted to Bathsheba, but calmly lives with the pain of her rejection. He, however, has become bailiff of the farm, and fate seems to be smiling on him, hinting of good things to come.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:52:44 AM