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MonkeyNotes-Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
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Chapter 57

Bathsheba wants to be married quietly. Gabriel and she appear before the parson one misty morning with Liddy and Laban Tall (now clerk of the parish) as witnesses. The village folk gather outside Bathsheba's parlor that evening and give noisy and enthusiastic expression to their joy and goodwill. The men tease Gabriel in a gentle way. As these men do not want to intrude on the newly married couple by entering for refreshment, Gabriel sends food and drink for them down to Warren's Malthouse. There they can drink a toast to the newly married couple.


Notes

All's well that ends well. Gloom is dispelled rather unusually in this novel of Hardy. The novel ends on a note of good humor and happiness with no visible trouble in store for Bathsheba and Gabriel. The novel is brilliantly rounded off with excellent country dialogue between Coggan and Mrs. Tall introducing a scene of delicious but realistic comedy.

The delightful prospect of a long and peaceful life for Bathsheba and Gabriel is the natural end of the novel. After long suffering, they are truly entitled to their happiness. Fortunately, during the course of the novel, Bathsheba matured and put away her vanity, pride, and false appearance. She marries Gabriel for love, not out of infatuation or guilt. On behalf of the rustics, Joseph Poorgrass showers his benediction on Gabriel and Bathsheba for a life of happiness.

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MonkeyNotes-Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

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