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MonkeyNotes-The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald-Free Booknotes Summary
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CHARACTER LIST

Minor Characters

Jordan Baker

Daisy's good friend. She is an attractive and wealthy young golfer whom Nick dates while he is in New York. A compulsive liar and a cheat, she is almost as shallow and careless as Daisy.

George Wilson

Myrtle's husband and the owner of a garage in the Valley of Ashes. He idolizes his wife and goes crazy when she is killed. Thinking that Gatsby is responsible for her death, he shoots him and then kills himself.


Catherine

The sister of Myrtle who is as tacky and ostentatious as Myrtle.

Mr. and Mrs. McKee

The couple who lives in the apartment below the one that Tom keeps for Myrtle in the city. They come to the party at Myrtle's apartment.

Meyer Wolfsheim

The shady Jewish business associate of Gatsby. He wears human molars as cufflinks, fixed the world series, and makes his money through gambling and racketeering.

Michaelis

One of the few friends of George Wilson. He is a young Greek man who owns a coffee shop in the Valley of Ashes, located next to Wilson's garage. He is the only eye witness to Myrtle's accidental death and tries to comfort Wilson over the loss.

Owl-Eyes

A middle-aged man who frequents Gatsby's parties. He is one of the few people who show up at Gatsby's funeral.

Klipspringer

A frequent guest at Gatsby's parties, who is called "the boarder" and often plays the piano.

Dan Cody

The wealthy man who employed Gatsby as a youth and taught him about business. Although he is never actually seen in the novel, Gatsby explains all about him to Nick, and he is instrumental in shaping Gatsby's life.

Henry C. Gatz

Gatsby's father. He is seen for the first time when he comes to his son's funeral. He is an old, nervous man who is proud of Gatsby's wealth.

Pammy Buchanan

The daughter of Tom and Daisy. She appears only for a moment in the book to show that Daisy is incapable of any depth of maternal love; for her, Pammy is a toy or plaything.

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