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MonkeyNotes-The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
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Chapter 4

Jake Blount wakes up in the afternoon and finds himself in Mr. Singerís room. He is confused about what he did the night before. He knows he was drunk and he sees that his fists are bruised, cut, and swollen, but he canít remember any details. He looks over at Mr. Singer and wonders why he is so quiet. Mr. Singer offers him water to drink and then hands him a card telling him he is a deaf- mute and that it is not necessary to shout at him because he can read lips. Jake is shocked find out Mr. Singer is a "dummy." He wonders if there are other deaf-mutes in the town and when Mr. Singer shakes his head to indicate that there are not, Jake asks if he gets lonely. Mr. Singer shakes his head, but this time it is unclear if he is indicating affirmation or negation. Singer offers to put a mattress out on the floor for Jake to use for the next few days, but Jake declines the offer.

He leaves the house. As he leaves he sees two African-American men walking up the street dressed in white suits and white shoes, one is wearing bright green tie and socks and the other s wearing hot red tie and socks and is playing the harmonica. He hears the African-American housekeeper come out and greet them. She walks between them and they discuss their plans of going to church. She says she will visit her father after church.

Jake wanders the streets until he finds himself back at Biff Brannonís cafe. He finds an advertisement for a mechanic to work at a carnival, the Sunny Dixie Show. Inside the cafe, he finds out the total of his bill and is assured by Biff that he neednít hurry to pay it. He finds out what the town is like. It has thirty thousand people, several cotton mills, a hosiery factory, some gins and sawmills. Most European-American men make between ten to eleven dollars a week and get laid off regularly.


He walks toward the carnival and notices the extreme poverty of the mill workers and their families. He speaks to the manager of the carnival, Patterson, and gets the job immediately. He is warned against the ways of African-Americans who try to get a ride without paying. Jake leaves and walks back through the mill neighborhood. He feels light-headed. He speaks aloud, "Resentment is the most precious flower of poverty. Yeah" and feels good to hear his voice. He feels lonesome. He finds three men sitting on a porch and approaches them to talk. He tells them he has some gospel to tell, not about God, but about workerís rights. He talks about the economic injustice the men suffer and wonders if they ever get mad. The men look at him without comprehension and he gets upset by their lack of feeling. The men start to laugh at him and he walks off stiffly.

He goes to a fruit store and buys some fruit with the last of his money. He takes it to Singer. Singer smiles and offers him wine. Jake begins to talk. Singer looks at him without much response. When Jake talks politics, Singer writes a question on a card asking if Jake is a Democrat or a Republican. Jake ignores the question and goes on talking. He feels hypnotized by staring into Singerís eyes. He decides to stay with Singer for a few days until he makes his first money. They pull out the mattress and Jake lies down and goes to sleep.

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MonkeyNotes-The Heart Is A Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
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