free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Henry IV, Part 1 by William Shakespeare
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

PLOT (Structure)

Many Shakespearean plays have two plots running together, the main plot and the subplot, with the conflict being exposed in the main plot of the play. In this historical play, the main plot has the serious theme of insurgents rebelling against the king. The sub-plot consists of minor characters who provide comic relief and laughter. The main plot and the subplot alternate at just the right moment, so that the audience does not get an overdose of either the serious or the ludicrous.


Prince Hal, a royal member, who should belong to the main plot, is introduced in the subplot with Falstaff and the robbers. So Prince Hal is the link between the two plots. The main plot and the subplot merge in the middle of 1 Henry IV, when Hal forswears his misbehavior and vows to support his father in crushing the rebellion. This signals the true climax of the play, although the defeat of the rebels comes much later. From here, the outcome is certain. As the king's forces become more and more unified, the rebels fall into dispute and disarray due to internal conflicts. The outcome of the conflict is the king's victory over the rebels at Shrewsbury, and the play ends on a happy note.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Henry IV, Part 1 by William Shakespeare
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:52:51 AM