free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Henry IV, Part 2 by William Shakespeare
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Notes

This scene is important since it brings the major issues to a climax and points to a settlement. In the first part of the scene, Westmoreland reproves York for being a rebel when he should be a man promoting harmony and peace. “If that rebellion Came like itself, in base and abject routs,/ Led on by bloody youth, guarded with rags” presents a lively image is. Guarded can mean trimmed and the rebellion is presented in terms of “abject” disorder and beggary. Rebellion allegorically personified progressing as a monarch through a beggarly crowd followed by blood-stained youth and supported by boys and beggary. In the lines, “Wherefore do you so ill translate youself/ Out of the speech of peace that bears such grace/ Into the harsh and boist’rous tongue of war,” we can see the image of “translation” on which the whole passage is built. It ironically refers to York’s literary occupations now set aside. “Graves” result from the “boist’rous tongue of war” and books from the graceful speech of peace. York replies that though he appears to be an enemy of peace and a rebel leader, that is only for a while. His main objective is to establish true peace in the nation and see to it that the people’s grievances are duly settled.


Though he had offered the grievances to the King, they have not been accepted. Here we can see the dilemma of York being both a spiritual leader and a social leader (rebel). Westmoreland asks York, who had denied his requisition so that “That you should sea this lawless bloody book/ Of forg’d rebellion with a seal divine.” York’s power to license the press is enlightened here. When York agrees to Westmoreland’s suggestion to give the Prince a chance to hear their grievances, Mowbray objects suspecting it to be a trick. He thinks that the King will never forget their actions towards him and that they are strong enough to oppose the King. Mowbray’s speech to Westmoreland about the past takes us back to the quarrel between the first Duke of Norfolk and Bolingbroke, the man who now rules England. He is portrayed as a cautious, skeptical leader of the rebels. Unlike Mowbray, Hastings seems to be an optimistic and wishful leader who can never see the bad side of things. York finally agrees to submit the grievances to Hal and says that if all of them are granted pardons and their demands are satisfactorily settled, they shall in future restrict themselves to their own affairs and support the cause of peace. “To us and to our purposes confin’d/ We come within our aweful banks again,/ And knit our powers to the arm of peace.” Hastings says that the King is tired of wars and is now a “fangless lion.”

York assures Mowbray that if their grievances are not properly settled, then the rebel forces will be much stronger than before: “Our peace will, like a broken limb united,/ Grow stronger for the breaking.” This medical fact implies that just as a broken bone is the stronger when it is well set, so is the strength of the rebels, if they are cheated. Westmoreland arrives and announces that the Prince has come to give them a hearing. York happily exclaims, “Before and greet his Grace My Lord, we come.” These are the last words of York. The urgent actions, plans, and the optimistic imagination of York about the future come to an end.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Henry IV, Part 2 by William Shakespeare
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:52:51 AM