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MonkeyNotes-Inherit the Wind by Jerome Lawrence & Robert E. Lee
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On the same night, Reverend Brown holds an emotional revival meeting, which Brady attends. Brown works his congregation into a frenzy, leading them through the story of the six days of creation and then encouraging them to condemn Bert Cates to hell. He prays that God will strike Cates down immediately. Rachel tries to stop her father, but he curses her as well. Brady finally pulls Brown away from the pulpit and tells him that the Bible warns against creating trouble. He quotes a Bible verse that gives the play its title: the man who makes trouble in his own house will inherit the wind. The revival finally breaks up, and everyone departs. Drummond and Brady remain alone on stage. Brady asks Drummond how he has gone so far away from the days when the two of them were friends. Drummond answers that he has dared to progress in his thinking, while Brady has remained set in his ideas.

Two days later in court, Brady is examining Howard, a boy who was in Cates' class. It is clear that Howard understands evolution and Brady tries to lead the boy to say things that incriminate Cates. Drummond repeatedly objects to the questioning, but the judge always overrules his objections. When it is Drummond's turn to question Howard, he asks him what he thinks about evolution. Davenport, one of the prosecuting attorneys, objects that Howard is too young to answer such a question. Drummond asserts that he is only trying to establish that each person has a right to think things through for himself. By the time Howard is through with his cross-examination and is dismissed from the witness stand, he has a great admiration for Drummond. Next, Brady puts Rachel Brown on the stand and forces her, through his questioning, to incriminate Cates. She becomes so upset that she loses the power of speech and has to be led away from the witness stand.


It is Drummond's turn to call witnesses, but all the experts he has called to Hillsboro are unacceptable to the judge because they are supporters of the theory of evolution. Drummond feels momentarily defeated; but then he has a brilliant idea. He decides to call Brady to the witness stand. Even though Davenport objects, Brady willingly agrees, certain that Drummond can do him or his case no harm. Drummond begins by questioning Brady on several stories of the Bible, all of which Brady interprets literally; the stories, however, are not rational if scrutinized literally. As a result, Brady begins to look ridiculous. The people in the courtroom begin to turn. The audience switches its allegiance to Drummond; Brady is horribly shaken by the turn of events. In his nervousness, he loses all self-confidence and begins to babble the books of the Bible. The judge calls a recess. Everyone leaves the courtroom except for Brady and his wife, who holds her husband and calls him baby. She promises that everything will be all right.

The next day, everyone in the court is waiting for the jury to return a verdict. Even a radio announcer has come to broadcast the outcome of the trial, which has attracted national attention. The defendant is very nervous; he is afraid of the outcome of the trial and what will happen to him. Drummond insists that Cates has done the right thing in standing up for his right to think freely. The jury enters and announces a guilty verdict for Cates.

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