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MonkeyNotes-Ivanhoe by Sir Walter Scott
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Chapter 4

When the richly dressed guests enter Cedric's hall, he receives them politely but without any warmth. He then scolds Gurth and Wamba for being late. When Rowena enters to join in the meal, Bois-Guilbert stares at her beauty. In response, she draws a veil over her face. Cedric notices the interchange and is annoyed with the Templar. The chapter ends with the announcement of a stranger at Cedric's gates.


Notes

In this chapter, the antagonism between the Normans and the Saxons is clearly drawn. Cedric's forced hospitality is obvious; his pride dictates that his best food and drink be set before the Normans, for he wants them to realize that Saxons can do as well, if not better, than Normans when it comes to good and plentiful food.

Cedric is aware of the hypocritical behavior and notoriously loose morals of the Knight Templars. Though by definition, the order of knights is supposed to be brave, chaste, and modest in lifestyle, in actuality, they tend to live in immorality and luxury. Cedric is understandably annoyed and protective when Bois-Guilbert eyes Rowena. He has great plans for her and resents even the suggestion of immorality naturally associated with a Knight Templar.

The chapter ends with a touch of mystery. The servant enters to announce that there is a stranger calling at Cedric's gates.

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