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MonkeyNotes-Lord Jim by Joseph Conrad
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Chapter 27

Summary

With the help of Doramin's people as allies, Jim oversees the hauling of two cannons up the mountain, working all night. Sherif Ali watched in disbelief as Doramin had himself carried up the mountain to have a good view of the fighting. The Bugis fired at Sherif Ali's stronghold on the opposite mountain, destroying it with cannon balls. The Bugis then attacked the remains. Jim and Dain Waris were the first to enter the ruins. Jim's servant, Tamb'Itam was constantly by his side. Sherif Ali fell on his knees and asked for forgiveness. He pledged obedience and was forgiven. Joy spread round Patusan, and Jim became a hero on whom the natives depended. Jim took their devotion very seriously and felt great responsibility towards them.


Notes

Because of the defeat of Sherif Ali, Jim becomes a hero in the eyes of the Malays and is soon referred to as Tuan Jim, or Lord Jim. The Bugis think he has supernatural powers and begin to worship him. They accept his word as the truth; "his word decided everything." Marlow comments that Jim is one of those exceptional men whose fame spreads like wild fire; unfortunately, his adoration leads to his isolation from the common people and the attendant loneliness. For the most part, he is cut off from his world. Only Tamb'Itam, Jim's personal servant who follows him like a shadow until the last day of Jim's life, gives him regular human contact.

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