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MonkeyNotes-Middlemarch by George Eliot
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Chapter 75

Summary

Rosamond is disconsolate and thoroughly dissatisfied. She writes off Lydgate’s brooding as just "being disagreeable." She has turned hostile to him as the main source of her unhappiness. Ladislaw’s departure, the snub from Lydgate’s uncle, all contributes to her frustration. But she still does not know about his disgrace. She decides on a small party to dispel the gloom. To her surprise, the guests all decline the invitation. On finding out, Lydgate is in a fury, but he still balks at explaining. Rosamond goes to her parents and finds out the whole story she is demoralized. She wishes she could return to her father’s house. She is silent before everyone. This convinces her parents of her courage, while Lydgate feels the alienation more acutely. His being innocent or otherwise does not interest her; it is only the shame that counts. She drives home the point that they should leave the town and migrate to the city. The only hopeful event for her is that Ladislaw is to visit Middlemarch.


Notes

Rosamond is one character in the books who lacks any sort of complexity. All her actions are predetermined, and she is characterized by pettiness, social climbing and a total lack of sympathy for everyone except herself. This is considered by critics to be one of the flaws in a novel in which even minor characters come alive.

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