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MonkeyNotes-Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
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Act IV, Scene 2

Dogberry interrogates the two culprits, Borachio and Conrade, and their statements are recorded by the Sexton. They now need to be brought before Leonato, the governor, for action to be taken against them.


Notes

This is a humorous, relief-filled scene. The comic interlude is meant to cheer the audience and provide an avenue for resolution of the conflict. Dogberry and Verges are amusing with their foolish dialogue and malapropisms. "Dissembly" is used for the word "assembly"; "perjury" for "sedition"; "burglary" for "bribery"; "redemption" for "damnation." Verges uses the word "exhibition" for "commission." The humor is further derived from Dogberry's insistence that the word "ass" should also be recorded because Conrade has called him one. The comic interlude is a necessary part of relieving the tension brought on in previous scenes, especially in the comedies.

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MonkeyNotes-Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare
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