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MonkeyNotes-Our Town by Thornton Wilder
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Act II, Section 2

Summary

As Howie Newsome delivers milk, he is joined by Si Crowell, Joe Crowell's younger brother. Si, who is now the paperboy, is concerned about the fact that Grover's Corners is losing its best pitcher since George Gibbs is giving up baseball for matrimony. Constable Warren enters to check the drainpipes. Since it has been pouring rain all night, he fears a flood. Howie Newsome says that the sky will probably clear soon.

Constable Warren and Si Crowell depart, and Howie Newsome continues to deliver the milk. When he arrives at the Gibbs' house, he finds Mrs. Gibbs by the trellis. She orders extra milk and some cream, for she expects to have visitors after the wedding. A similar order is placed by Mrs. Webb. Howie tells her that he and his wife are sure that Emily and George will make a fine couple and live happily.

Doc Gibbs enters and sits at the breakfast table. He teases his wife about "losin' one of her chicks." Mrs. Gibbs is on the verge of tears and expresses her apprehension about Emily and George being too young to handle matrimony. He reminds her that the two of them had their own fears about marriage. He was afraid that they would run out of conversation after few years; but they have had plenty to talk about during their happy married life. Mrs. Gibbs admits that the natural order of things seems to be "two by two." George enters and jokes about having only five more hours of freedom before he becomes a married man. He starts outside to go and see his bride- to-be, but Mrs. Gibbs stops him and insists that he puts on his overshoes.


When George arrives at Emily's house, Mrs. Webb will not at first let him inside. She insists that it will bring bad luck to the marriage if he sees his fiancée on her wedding day before she walks down the aisle. George turns to Mr. Webb and asks him if believes in such superstitions. With practicality, he replies that superstitions generally clothe a lot of common sense. When Mr. Webb engages his future son-in-law in a conversation about weddings, marriage, and life, Mrs. Webb goes upstairs to make certain that Emily does not come down.

As George talks to his future father-in-law, he says he wishes that weddings were not such public affairs. Mr. Webb explains that women like for everyone to see a man tie the knot. He then tells George that when he was getting married, his own father had given him advice about controlling his future wife. He adds that he never followed that advice and, therefore, has had a happy marriage. He advises George not to blindly follow the advice of others. Mrs. Webb returns to the room and asks George to leave so that Emily can come down for breakfast. Mr. Webb makes a joke by saying, "No bridegroom should see his father-in-law on the day of the wedding."

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