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MonkeyNotes-A Passage to India by E. M. Forster
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Minor Characters

The Turtons - Mr. Turton is the highest-ranking collector at Chandrapore. His attitude towards the Indians is patronizing. He does not understand their culture nor does he make an attempt to care for their aspirations. Mrs. Turton is worse than her husband in the sense that she is unabated in her contempt for Indians. At the trial she becomes a virago.

Ralph and Stella - the children of Mrs. Moore by her second marriage. They are left in England during Mrs. Moore's trip. Forster does not develop their characters, and they are presented only towards the end of the novel. Stella Moore is married to Fielding, who confides to Aziz that his wife is inclined towards the spiritual. Ralph is an idiot savant.

Miss Derek - another Englishwoman who travels in the same social circles as Adela, Mrs. Moore, and the Turtons. She works for a Raj of another province, but spends her time driving around India and visiting her British friends in Chandrapore. She is rather shallow and is portrayed as a female opportunist of the worst type. She is, however, quite able to take care of herself and has a wild sense of humor.

Major Callendar - Aziz's superior at the hospital. He is a pompous bully who is resentful that Aziz is a more skillful surgeon than he. Forster portrays him as a caricature of an administrator.

Mr. McBryde - the District Superintendent of Police. He is a cynical bully. He is supposedly tolerant and courteous to Aziz after his arrest, but holds outlandish ideas of race relations, misunderstanding Aziz entirely. He becomes the center of a scandal in Chandrapore.


Hamidullah - Aziz's uncle. Educated in England, he has several close British friends. The arrest of his nephew on trumped up charges disillusions him about the British rule in India. The trial of Aziz, and its aftermath, makes him less tolerant and more openly hostile to the British. During the novel, he turns from innocence to cynicism.

Dr. Panna Lal - a Hindu doctor. His servile attitude to the British makes him an object of ridicule. He changes camps when convenient, chastising himself in a gross show of humility.

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