free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-A Passage to India by E. M. Forster
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Chapter 26

Adela wants to talk, but Fielding is quiet; he patiently listens to her as she explains her state of mind before and after the trial. She says that she has not felt quite herself since the day of the tea party. She tries to understand what has happened to her in the cave; perhaps it was a ghost or another guide. Fielding theorizes that Adela has been under a period of hallucination and is now completely out of it. Fielding then remembers Aziz's harsh personal comments about Adela, and they make him uncomfortable.

Hamidullah enters Fielding's house and is displeased to find Adela there. He is furious with Adela for what she has done to Aziz and refuses to accept her explanation. He resents her nonchalant behavior; if she had been begging or sobbing, he would be more inclined to forgive her, but she is a picture of calm control. He tells her everyone would be happy if she just disappeared. India is obviously done with Adela, just as they were done with Mrs. Moore.

Fielding tells Adela that she can stay at the college for a couple of days, but she does not want to put anyone to trouble. Hamidullah remarks on how much trouble Adela has already been. At this moment Ronny arrives, almost in a state of shock, but still arrogant. He states that Mrs. Moore has died at sea. Hamidullah feels this is Ronny's punishment for having smuggled her out to England before the trial. Fielding argues about the usefulness of Mrs. Moore at the trial; he does not think she would have been any help.

Adela asks if she can stay with Fielding, and he agrees after checking with Ronny; it is probably the only safe haven for her in Chandrapore. After she is settled, he goes with Hamidullah to the Indian festivities. Along the way, Fielding is shocked to learn that the Indians are about to demand twenty-thousand rupees from Adela as compensation for the trouble she has caused. He feels badly for Adela, for in the end she has been honest.


Notes

This chapter exposes some of the harsher sides of human nature. Adela tries to explain things to Fielding; she says that she has not been herself since the tea party, and the visit to the Marabar disoriented her completely. She even admits that perhaps she suffered a hallucination in the caves. She also says that she felt very close to Mrs. Moore and misses her greatly, especially since she can no longer bear to be with Ronny. Fielding understands her confusion and realizes the bravery of her confession.

During the course of the chapter, Adela experiences many emotions. When Hamidullah accuses her of being personally responsible for the humiliation of Aziz and is openly rude to her, she feels shame. She also shows a concern for others when she tells Fielding she does not want him to go out of his way for her or to feel responsible for her safety. When the arrogant Ronny comes to Fielding's house but refuses to come in, Adela is upset at his rudeness. When he tells her that his mother has died at sea, Adela is grieved, for she truly cared for Mrs. Moore.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-A Passage to India by E. M. Forster
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 9/18/2007 12:10:24 AM