free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen-Free Plot Summary
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version | Barron's Booknotes

Chapter 40

Summary

No longer able to restrain herself, Elizabeth tells Jane about Darcy’s proposal and her rejection of it; the kind-hearted Jane feels sorry for Darcy. Elizabeth also tells about Darcy’s letter and explains about Wickham. Jane, who is oblivious to the existence of wickedness in the world, finds it hard to understand Wickham’s depravity. Elizabeth does not tell Jane of Darcy’s influencing Bingley against her, for she knows her sister still has a tender love for Bingley.

Mrs. Bennet continues her easy criticism. She calls Bingley an ‘undeserving young man’ who has treated Jane shabbily. She also makes barbed comments about the Collins.


Notes

Jane’s stay in London has restored her health, but has not ended her love for Bingley. As a result, Elizabeth is very careful what she says to her sister. Elizabeth’s eagerness to confide in Jane shows the deep friendship between the two. Although very close to each other, the two sisters are radically different in their temperaments. Jane is a ‘simple’ woman--uncomplicated, unintuitive, and full of undiscriminating goodness. Elizabeth is a ‘complex’ woman--rational, intuitive, and judgmental. As a result, Jane has trouble understanding Wickham’s behavior and feels sorry for Darcy.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version | Barron's Booknotes


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
Free Study Guide-Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen-Free Online Booknotes
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:23 AM