free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Richard then asks Gaunt why he did not act as Bolingbroke's advocate during the council meeting. Gaunt replies that he had acted then in his capacity as a judge, and not as a father concerned about his son. He wished to avoid compromising his reputation as a judge and thus was stricter than usual. He must now bear the consequences of that decision.


Richard exits, leaving Gaunt alone with Bolingbroke, Aumerle and Marshal. Gaunt tries to comfort his son by saying that six years is not a very long period of time and will pass away quickly. Bolingbroke replies that grief has the ability to make one hour seem ten. Gaunt advises him to think of it as time taken for a pleasure trip. But Bolingbroke sees it as "an inforced pilgrimage." Gaunt attempts to rouse Bolingbroke's spirits by saying that he has not been exiled, but is fleeing from a pestilence-ridden atmosphere to a fairer climate. But Bolingbroke remains cynical. He leaves bidding farewell to the sweet soil of England and consoles himself that he is still a true Englishman, although he has been banished.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:25 AM