free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Act II, Scene 3

In Gloucestershire, Bolingbroke is engaged in conversation with Northumberland. Bolingbroke asks Northumberland how long it will take them to reach Berkeley. Northumberland replies that he himself is a stranger in Gloucestershire, but Bolingbroke's "fair discourse" has been like "sugar" and has made the hard way "sweet and delectable." He adds that Ross and Willoughby must find their way from Ravenspurgh to Cotswold tedious, but the prospect of enjoying noble company will ease their journey.

Henry Percy, Northumberland's son, enters with news of the political developments. He offers his "tender, raw, and young" service to Bolingbroke, who accepts it graciously. As they discuss their present military positioning, Ross and Willoughby enter, "bloody with spurring, fiery-red with haste." They too offer their services and military support to Bolingbroke. Then the Lord of Berkeley enters with a message from the Duke of York. Bolingbroke gets offended when Berkeley addresses him as "Lord of Hereford." He tells Berkeley to address him by his correct title, Duke of Lancaster. Berkeley apologizes, saying that he had no intention whatsoever of insulting Bolingbroke, but had been sent by York to find out about the reason for Bolingbroke's arrival in England with his army.


Then the Duke of York enters and is received by Bolingbroke, who kneels before him as a mark of respect. Bolingbroke addresses him as "my gracious uncle," but is cut short by York. York then asks Bolingbroke the reason he has violated his sentence of exile. He warns Bolingbroke that just because Richard is in Ireland does not mean that England is defenseless. He recalls his days of youth when he, along with Gaunt, had rescued the Black Prince from the French. But Bolingbroke refuses to believe that he is guilty of any fault. He says that he was banished as Lord of Hereford and has now come to claim his title as Duke of Lancaster. He beseeches York to "look on (his) wrongs with an indifferent eye." He sees the image of his father (Gaunt) in York and begs York to treat him like his son. He stresses his natural right of inheritance and maintains that Richard has grossly wronged him by plucking away his "rights and royalties" by force and bestowing them on "upstart unthrifts." He tells York that if he had died first (instead of Gaunt), and if his son, Aumerle, had been treated in a like manner by Richard, then Gaunt would have surely supported Aumerle "to rouse his wrongs and chase them to the bay."

Northumberland, Ross and Willoughby assert in unison that Bolingbroke has been wronged by Richard. York confesses that he has had the "feeling of (his) cousin's wrongs" and had done all that he could to right these wrongs. But he does not approve of Bolingbroke's mode of coming to England with an army and denounces all of them as rebels. Northumberland asserts that they will all support Bolingbroke. York acknowledges that his power is weak. His army cannot defeat Bolingbroke and make him "stoop / Unto the sovereign mercy of the king." Bolingbroke asks York to join him in his expedition to Bristol Castle, where Bushy, Bagot and their accomplices are taking refuge. York finds this proposal appealing and says, "It may be I will go with you," but he reminds himself that he cannot break the country's laws. He welcomes Bolingbroke as neither friend nor foe and remarks with resignation, "things past redress are now with me past care."

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:25 AM