free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

Notes

In this scene Richard surrenders unconditionally to Bolingbroke. Bolingbroke has arrived before Flint Castle and sees Richard on the walls. His appearance is striking and all those present comment on how much Richard looks like a king. Richard's supporters, Aumerle, Scroop, Salisbury and the Bishop of Carlisle, do not say much during this scene. Bolingbroke and his men march towards the castle. Richard appears on the balcony. At the beginning of the scene, Bolingbroke appears to be supremely confident. He sends a message of allegiance and deference to Richard's authority based on two conditions. These are that his banishment be repealed and that the property confiscated by Richard on Gaunt's death be restored to him. Bolingbroke does not reveal any intention of usurping Richard's power at this point in time. In fact Bolingbroke is wary of assuming control of the nation and is silent on this point until the crown is actually placed in his hands.


Despite Richard's dazzling, regal appearance, he agrees to Bolingbroke's demands without any protest. He then hesitantly asks Aumerle if he should have been more defiant in his answer to Bolingbroke. Aumerle tells him to gain time by consenting now so that they may have a chance of strengthening their side. Richard again sinks into despair and is shaken out of it by the return of Northumberland. Richard launches into a lament about his fallen condition in front of Northumberland. But this does not affect Northumberland, who simply asks Richard to come down into the court to meet Bolingbroke. Richard descends literally as well as symbolically. His fall is portrayed as he abandons the castle walls for the courtyard below.

When Richard arrives, Bolingbroke kneels as a mark of respect. It can be argued that he has no intentions of overthrowing Richard at this point and that he has misgivings about interfering with the kingship. His ambition expands as opportunities present themselves. Bolingbroke insists that he has come only for the restitution of his property. But Richard surrenders himself and plays on Bolingbroke's hesitance to win sympathy. He says, "I am yours and all" and continues to dominate the scene until the very end, when he forces Bolingbroke to give instructions to proceed to London. Bolingbroke says very little and the attention is focused on the reactions of Richard.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Richard II by William Shakespeare
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 8:53:25 AM