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MonkeyNotes-Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
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Notes

Crusoe's real troubles begin in this chapter. His first trading voyage nets him a handsome profit. Although Providence has been kind to him, he is greedy for more wealth and decides to become a Guinea trader. He seems to be punished for his greediness. His ship is attacked by a Moorish pirate ship, and Crusoe is forced to become the slave of the pirate captain. Since his slave life among the Moors is surprisingly easy, Crusoe does not really change. There is no repentance on his part, aside from his admission that his father's prophecy has come true. Crusoe also fails to accept God's role in his fate. But there is obviously something protecting Crusoe. It should be noted that he alone among all the other captives remains at the coast, which makes it possible for him to escape later.

Crusoe's enterprising nature is developed in this chapter. At the suggestion of the captain of the trading ship, Crusoe spends his last forty pounds on trinkets to trade. Because of his cleverness and business acumen, he succeeds in turning the trinkets into a profit of three hundred pounds. Additionally, Crusoe never lets opportunities pass him by. When he is taken in as a slave, he carefully observes everything going around him, for he is planning his escape. When the right opportunity presents itself, Crusoe throws a man overboard while they are fishing. He then steals the boat and sets forth on a journey, with Xury in tow.


The colonial overtone is felt in this chapter and will be more fully developed later in the novel. During the description of the incident between the natives and the leopards, it becomes apparent that white men feel they are superior. While the natives know the land and are at home in this environment, Crusoe knows he has a deadly weapon to help his cause. As a result, he feels he can conquer all adversity. When a ship is spotted on the horizon, Crusoe feels redeemed, for he will be given a fresh chance to make amends for his faults and past actions.

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MonkeyNotes-Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
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