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MonkeyNotes-Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
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Chapter 21: Time to Get Me a Servant

Two more years go by, and Crusoe spends time thinking of ways by which he could escape from the island. He again reflects philosophically on his past and regrets his greed, which his led to his present state. One night he has a vivid dream that savages land on his island with a victim, who breaks free and comes to his grove to hide. Crusoe rescues him and he becomes his servant. After this, Crusoe looks for the savages, hoping his dream will come true.

A year and a half later, Crusoe sees five canoes land on shore. About thirty savages emerge, build a fire, and begin to dance around it. Crusoe then sees two miserable wretches being dragged from the boats. One of them is immediately knocked down and killed. The other takes the opportunity to run away, straight towards Crusoe's castle. He is followed by three of the savages. The run-away swims across the creek with ease, and only two of his chasers follow him into water. Crusoe now appears on the scene and beckons to the fugitive.

Crusoe realizes the danger of firing his gun, for it could bring all the savages after him; instead, he advances on the two pursuers and knocks one down with a blow of his gun. When the other savage puts an arrow to his bow, Crusoe shoots him. The bewildered runaway, terrified by the gunshot, approaches his rescuer, lays his head on the ground, and places Crusoe's foot's upon it. The savage who has been knocked down now stirs, and the fugitive signals for Crusoe's sword with which he cuts off his enemy's head in one blow. They bury the dead cannibals in the sand, and Crusoe leads the fugitive to the cave where he gives him food and lets him sleep.


Notes

Crusoe's next two years are filled with thoughts of escape and reflections on his past. After having a dream, Crusoe entertains notions of capturing a human and making him into his slave to aid him in his escape from the island. The dream is significant, for like the earlier dream of the terrifying angel, it foreshadows later events. Within the chapter, a man will arrive on the island to become his servant.

Crusoe watches as approximately thirty savages land on shore, build a fire, and begin dancing. He then sees them drag two other humans from the canoes. One is immediately killed and one manages to escape. As the fugitive is pursued by three savages and then two, Crusoe makes the decision to help this poor run-away. He signals to the fugitive and approaches the pursuers. He knocks the first down with the butt of his gun and fires at the second savage, killing him. The fugitive finishes off the first savage with Crusoe's sword. The fugitive then indicates that he is in Crusoe's control by laying his head on the ground and placing Crusoe's foot on top of it. It is the fugitive's expression of appreciation to the man who has saved his life.

Crusoe wins the battle against the savages because he takes a stand against them, rather than being overcome with fear. He is also helped by his superior weapons and intelligent planning. Providence is obviously on his side and has answered his cry for a companion after all these years.

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MonkeyNotes-Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
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