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MonkeyNotes-Silas Marner by George Eliot
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Sixteen years pass, Eppie grows up to be a charming young woman. Dolly Winthrop's son wishes to marry her. She agrees to the marriage only on the condition that Silas would be permitted to live with them. Meanwhile, Dunstan's dead body and Silas' gold are found in the quarry. This discovery moves Godfrey to confession. Contrary to his speculation, Nancy is not disgusted with him and is sorry that they did not adopt Eppie earlier. The couple then proceeds to Silas' house to claim their daughter. Silas is unnerved by Godfrey's story, but does not stand in the way of Eppie's happiness. Eppie, however, refuses the life of luxury offered by her real father and prefers to stay with the man who has tenderly brought her up and whom she loves above anyone else in the world.


Silas goes to Lantern yard with Eppie in order to vindicate himself from the accusation of the old theft. At the old meeting house, his disgrace and bitterness are swept away by the winds of change, and Silas returns home a man at peace with himself and with God. Poetic justice asserts itself. Silas, the man falsely accused, stands acquitted and blessed, while Godfrey has to pay the wages of his sin and realizes that "Repentance doesn't alter what has been going on for sixteen years." The story draws towards a happy close. One fine summer day Eppie is married to Aaron, and the flowers bloom in their new house as if echoing their gladness.

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MonkeyNotes-Silas Marner by George Eliot
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