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MonkeyNotes-Silas Marner by George Eliot
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In the lack of a guiding principle and a cementing force, the inhabitants of the Red House are living scattered lives. There is a lack of communication and understanding in the family. The Squire allows the evils to grow due to his own heedlessness and then comes down heavily on his sons. Godfrey's habitual irresolution prevents him from communicating the truth to his father. In the absence of effective control, Dunstan has turned out to be an unscrupulous fellow. The character of the Squire comes out very strongly through his conversation with his son and the author's comments. He seems to oscillate between too much leniency and unrelenting hardness. Godfrey's judgment about his father is very accurate. He has "a sense that his father's indulgence had not been kindness, and had had a vague longing for some discipline that would have checked his own errant weakness and helped his better will."


In the novel, George Eliot has offered different manifestations of religious beliefs. To Silas, religion is a belief in an unseen power, a mystic communion with the divine. To the simple folks of Raveloe, religion is all about Christian rituals and charms to ward off evil. Godfrey's religion is chance or fate. Godfrey relies on chance to solve his problems but dreads one thing about it, "the orderly sequence by which the seed brings forth a crop of its own kind."

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MonkeyNotes-Silas Marner by George Eliot
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