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Free Study Guide-The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway-Free Book Notes
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CHAPTER SUMMARY AND NOTES

CHAPTER 11

Summary

On the trip to Burguete for fishing, Bill and Jake are crowded on the bus amongst the Spanish peasants and exposed to the hot sun and wind. In spite of the inconveniences on this journey, Jake and Bill both enjoy the trip, the scenery, and the native people. There is none of the complaining from Bill that was heard on the train ride to Bayonne. Instead, the two men, in high spirits over the prospect of fishing, enjoy wine from wineskins offered to them by the Spanish. They share their bottle of wine as well. Along the way, Jake once again appreciates some of the smaller things, a rocky hill, a cloud of dust, the growing grain. When the bus stops for a short while, Jake and Bill enjoy having a drink with some of the Basque men. As they travel into the mountains, Bill notices that it is cold. When they arrive in Burguete, they take lodgings at a simple mountain inn, have supper, and go to bed. Jake says, "It felt good to be warm in bed." He seems truly happy.


Notes

In this short chapter, the stage is set for the fishing vacation. The troubles of Paris are left behind, and Jake and Bill truly enjoy the journey in spite of sitting on top of the bus, exposed to the hot sun and wind. No one complains of the conditions, and everyone seems to enjoy the natural beauty that surrounds them, especially Jake. The two Americans quickly build an easy and warm camaraderie with their fellow Basque travelers. There is none of the tension in relations that they experience amongst the expatriates in Paris. Everything is shared, and everything is pleasant. The effect is telling on Jake and Bill. Bill speaks in complete sentences now. He is no longer as cynically witty as he was in Paris. Jake, who has insomnia in Paris, quickly goes to sleep in Spain. More importantly, Jake seems relaxed and truly happy for one of the first times in the book. Nothing seems to be troubling him.

Although Burquete is a small fishing town without many amenities and the inn is simple and sparse, there is a hint that the quaintness will not last much longer. The natives are beginning to enjoy the dollars that can be made from tourism. In fact, the inn has just recently added bathroom, and buses are beginning to regularly bring vacationers. Jake, however, savors the naturalness as it currently exists for the moment. At the same time, Hemingway seems to regret the fact that such lovely spots can never retain their pristine beauty.

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