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MonkeyNotes-Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Most of the guests depart quickly. Collis hangs around to ramble on about Rosemary’s wonderful performance. After Dick finally gets rid of him, he and Rosemary are alone. He asks her to join him as he stops to see some of his artist friends. Although he warns that Rosemary may not like them, she is glad to go anywhere with Dick. She is amazed by the honesty of the artists, both American and English. They say nasty things about the Divers to her and assume she is simple-minded because she is in films. When she and Dick depart, he apologizes for their rudeness. They then kiss, and Dick tries to remember how important Nicole is to him. Although he claims to love Rosemary, he insists that Nicole must not find out about them. At the hotel, they kiss on the stairwell and go to their respective rooms. Before going to bed, Rosemary writes to her mother, whom she does not miss at all.

The next night Dick has arranged a marvelous evening for the group with many exciting activities; they go on a boat, dine in a restaurant, dance to the sounds of musicians, and ride in the Shah's car. Rosemary is enchanted by the events, especially when she dances with Dick. As usual, Abe gets very inebriated, and Rosemary tells Mary she will help her get her husband home. Abe, however, does not want to stop partying, and the three of them wind up riding a produce cart at dawn. It is all very wild, but Rosemary cannot enjoy it since Dick is not present.

The next morning at the train station, Abe can barely stand up. He is bitter and wants a drink. He tells Nicole that he is tired of her and her husband. Nicole says she will always be around, for it is her job to hold things together; he responds that it is his job to tear them apart. As they argue, Dick finally shows up and smoothes things over. After they all struggle to get Abe on the train, Nicole notices the woman, a distant friend, to whom she has spoken earlier. The woman suddenly takes out a gun and shoots an Englishman who is trying to board the train. A huge crowd surges towards the catastrophe, which has created a terrible mess. As the woman is being arrested, Dick decides to try and help her, but Nicole stops him and calls the woman's sister. Rosemary comments that Dick is like her mother, always trying to help people. It is obvious that Dick does not appreciate the comparison. In fact, his ego has been hurt by both Nicole and Rosemary; he feels both women have degraded him with their comments.


The group goes to the Luxembourg Gardens. Rosemary leaves for an appointment as Collis shows up. The young man tells Dick about how Rosemary got into a romantic scrape with one of his friends on a train last year. He claims to have smoothed it all over, but Dick finds himself enraged to think of Rosemary and a boy in a darkened train compartment. He takes leave of Collis and goes to the bank, where his major worry is which cashier to see. He does not want to attract suspicion about taking money out of his wife's account again, but her account is much larger than his. After the bank, he finds himself walking to the studio where Rosemary had her appointment. He waits outside, feeling ridiculous and knowing he has reached a turning point.

As Dick waits for almost an hour, he talks to a strange American fellow who is also waiting outside the studio, hoping to get a part in a film. Dick finally leaves, calls the hotel, and learns that Rosemary has already returned. She says she is sorry she missed him and wishes he were with her. When Rosemary hangs up, she continues to write a letter to her mother, explaining how she has fallen in love with her new director. She adds that an immediate return to Hollywood would be a good idea, even though she thinks the Divers are divine.

The next morning, Nicole, alone in her room, is awakened by a knock at the door; the voice asks for Abe North. Nicole says he left yesterday, but the man insists he is still in the hotel and mentions a theft. Nicole, feeling confused, quickly dresses. When the phone rings, the voice on the other end asks more questions about Abe, annoying Nicole. She is glad to get out of the hotel to go the dressmaker and shopping with Rosemary; Rosemary is amazed at the way Nicole spends money. When the ladies return to the hotel, Dick is there. Nicole complains about Abe's behavior, which annoys her husband. The three of them go to have lunch. The table next to them is a group who has come to Europe to find their dead husbands and sons. Dick politely asks if the curtain between the tables can be drawn. While Nicole, Rosemary, and Dick are having lunch, Abe North is in the bar at the Ritz, drinking heavily. A Negro man comes to look for him, but he is not allowed in the bar because of his color and appearance. Abe is terribly drunk and cannot understand what is going on.

Dick goes off to see what he can do for the woman who shot the man the day before. When he returns to the hotel, he goes to Rosemary's room, where they kiss and snuggle. When there is a knock on the door, they both freeze, fearing it is Nicole. Dick regains his composure and acts like he is just leaving after having delivered a message. The knock has come from Abe North, who appears frightened and aged. He explains that there has been a fight and arrests; one Negro man was mistaken for another Negro man. Abe knows he gave money to one of them, but he is very confused.

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