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MonkeyNotes-Timon of Athens by William Shakespeare
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LIST OF CHARACTERS

Major Characters

Timon

He is the main character of the play. He is an innocent man in the corrupt society of Athens, where meanness, selfishness, and hypocrisy exist with their commercial values. Timon, who is a wealthy man, is very generous to his friends and often bestows them with gifts. These friends however refuse to help him when Timon goes bankrupt. Timon leaves Athens for the woods. He comes across a lot of gold, which he uses to bring ruin to the society. Timon therefore becomes a misanthrope, a hater of mankind. Therefore one can say that there is magnificence in his goodness as there is absurdity in his hatred. Timon dies in the woods and it is here that he is buried.

Alcibiades

He is an Athenian Captain, who is also Timonís friend. He is sketched as a typical young soldier. Alcibiades, like Timon, faces the ingratitude of man. The Senate refuses to listen to his request and pardon his friend, who has been sentenced to death for committing a murder. They also send Alcibiades to exile for supporting this wrong act. Unlike Timon, Alcibiades does not allow himself to be destroyed, but vows to conquer Athens. He therefore revolts against the evil in his surrounding. After defeating the Senators, Alcibiades decides to form a government, which will be based on noble principles.

Apemantus

Apemantus is a philosopher who is considered unfit for Society. In Timonís good times and bad times, he is contrasted with Apemantus. Apemantus is a hater of mankind. In the beginning of the play, Timon does not agree with his opinion of mankind. After his appearance in Act I and II, Apemantus reappears in Act IV, to jeer and not to sympathize with Timon. After his friends disillusion Timon, he descends to the level of Apemantus and he too becomes a hater of mankind.


Flavius

He is Timonís faithful steward. Like Apemantus, he too suspects the duplicity of his masterís Ďfriends.í Flavius tries to curb Timonís reckless spending by telling him about his dwindling fortune. Timon however does not listen to him. Flavius shares his money with his fellow servants after Timon leaves Athens for the woods. Flavius goes to meet Timon after he has settled in the woods and offers to share his savings with him and also serve him.

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