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MonkeyNotes-Tom Jones by Henry Fielding
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Notes

The situation reveals ‘dramatic irony’ used by Fielding--the readers know that Sophia has been at the Inn but Tom doesn’t. Thus here the reader is one up on the protagonist! Tom returns to his own room after a night with Mrs. Waters. Partridge talks to Tom, urging him to a point of view that would be beneficial to him. Partridge does not want Tom to join the army because he has his own selfish motive. He would rather accompany Tom and have him reconciled to Squire Allworthy, so that his own fortune is made too.

Partridge is not a villain, but is quaintly a man of the world. He is bothered about his own well being and wouldn't mind lying to ensure it. Partridge is a man who adds much interest to Tom's travels on the highway. The narration would not have been as enjoyable without Partridge's presence.

Tom finds Sophia's muff and is quite shocked. He now regrets his short affair with Mrs. Waters. The lesson that Tom has to learn in this history is that he cannot afford to keep getting carried away by the attractions of flirtatious women.

The two Irish gentlemen too decide to leave the inn. Fielding builds such a setup that the characters arrive at the Inn together and leave together too.

Now there is another twist to the Upton events. Squire Western arrives there looking for his daughter. He argues with Tom on seeing him. Their previous friendship holds no value, as now they are on war footing.

Every individual is after his own interest. There are two characters who wish to restore their relationship with Squire Allworthy. They are - Partridge & Jenny Jones. The other two characters who want to be in the good books of Squire Western are Lord Fitzpatrick and Lady Fitzpatrick. All the four above- mentioned characters work in a manner that can ensure the completion of the goal. Thus Lord Fitzpatrick in this book endeavors to reconcile himself with Squire Western by condemning Tom and by trying to help him find his daughter. He assumes that the lady he had seen with Tom is the lost daughter and urges Squire Western to her room. The Squire bursts into Mrs. Waters' room only to find that she is not Sophia. The squire then goes down and confronts Tom again.


Fate had endeavored to bring a commission of peace to this same Inn. Lord Fitzpatrick continues to try and humor Squire Western. He announces that Tom could be legally tried for committing a robbery. Tom held Sophia's muff. Surprisingly, Susan comes to our hero's rescue and confesses that she had delivered the muff herself to Tom's room. Tom seems so good and handsome that women go out of their way to help him. Partridge of course supports his master and says that he was with Tom when the muff was found. Tom is thus acquitted.

Our misbehaving Tom hurries after Sophia now. He is a highly emotional man who makes promises and takes oaths at the spur of a moment. He now takes an oath that he will never let Sophia go again and that he will be faithful to her. We see later that he breaks this highly motivated oath.

In their hurry to look for Sophia, both her lover and father overlook the common niceties. Tom does not bid adieu to Mrs. Waters and Squire Western doesn't bother about Lord Fitzpatrick. Squire Western is a childish man who forgets everything and everybody else when he is involved with any burning issue.

The two Irish gentlemen leave the Inn along with Mrs. Waters. We are given to believe that Mrs. Waters might have begun yet another liaison with Lord Fitzpatrick.

The eight and ninth chapters take a peep back into the past. Inter penetration of past and present is a common feature throughout the novel. We read how Sophia's absence had caused tumult in the Western household and how she herself had managed to escape from her house. Sophia is desperately in love with Tom. When she learns about the route Tom had taken, she followed him to Upton. In this book, key characters reach Upton and a great drama takes place. The Upton events are wrapped up in the same Book and all the characters leave this little Inn.

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