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MonkeyNotes-The Trial by Franz Kafka
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If one views Leni's offer of exchange for Elsa's place in his affections it is submitting oneself to biological instincts. In a Christian sense it is also a lack of grace. The Huld-Leni figures show the turn events take if mediators assume the role of authorities. K. decides to fight firmly rather than seek help. We are also reminded of his uncle who tells K. that he would bring "disgrace" to the family. But the uncle does not face the reality. It also seems to be fatalistic that one has to be reconciled to one's circumstances. The Judiciary has to be stared only by the lawyer. A client has to keep a low profile and not attract attention. This is the view expressed by powers who control everybody, whichever may be the institution.


People seem to be dangerously losing their individuality. In spite of Huld's convoluted viewpoint he designates himself on a lesser degree than the great lawyers. He guides people safely through the verdict. He is also vacillating between weakness and pride. In a modern sense he represents unconditional sacrifice in earthly terms. Huld's character can be comprehended only in this manner in his relationship to Leni. Leni is bound with the physical, biological aspect in liberating outcasts and men with carefree joy.

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MonkeyNotes-The Trial by Franz Kafka
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