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MonkeyNotes-The Trial by Franz Kafka
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OTHER ELEMEMTS

Style

There are motifs of a Judaic kind. The debate with the priest and parable described by him is a Judaic style, which confuses and places the possibility of a solution. But finally K.'s problem remains unresolved. K. continues to think he is innocent though he says the law considers him guilty. The parable lead to a message that man has to be responsible for his guilt. The technique is also one of commentary - extensively on the Judicial bureaucracy.

Significance of ‘The Trial’

The Trial is an expansive view of the constant strife of the chief clerk and land surveyor, Joseph K. stretching over the orbit of an entire human life. There are constant parables, metaphors and the truck of 'illusion' interrupting the maze of descriptive passages. The meaning of the plot gets embedded in this maze. The parable approach validates and clarifies Kafka's point of view. The expense of K.'s life at two levels - one at the conscious and the other at the spiritual are revealed despite the narrow constructions of the plot and this gives a certain universality. Both are "Everyman". Their struggles are a longing for a general word order. This unique method is Kafka's attempt to transform the world into "the pure, the true, the unchangeable". Artistic and religions Themes are used to create a universal truth. He tries to fight destiny and human weaknesses. The work presents a conflict between human efforts and fate, which contradicts all the rules made by man. In ‘The Trial’ the characters do not interact with each other clearly as it happens in the real world. The events are hazy. There is unrest in the structure of thought processes and something seems to go wrong in the whole world endlessly. There is a never-ending depressive gloom presented in the role of the advocate and the painter until the priest offers some relief in the last chapters.


K.'s relationship with women is particularly significant. His egocentricity has made him move away from his mother whom he has not visited for years. Fräulein Bürstner does not attract his attention until after the arrest. He has failed to notice what is so close protecting, loving and feminine the other half of human nature. Kafka has presented the defect and inadequacy of man like K., in stark, clear-cut terms. But though Joseph K. is considered guilty. Nowhere is the guilt clearly sketched or formulated. Franz, the warder defines his guilt indirectly, which he says that though K. says he does not know the Law, he insists that he is innocent.

There is also another view that there is a socialistic trend to the story. Anyone who gets caught in this system of judicial administration is considered "guilty" while the court never listens to their pleas of innocence. Defending himself seems to be beyond human power, for Joseph K. It is about to destroy his career and life itself. The whole trial depends on man's motivation, caught in a chaotic world, but one who wishes to pause for a moment. Joseph K. tries to push away the knowledge of good and evil, thinking that the trial is a passing phase. But the earthly court also is incapable of knowing good and evil and pass judgement. The court is a continuous place of changing opinions that people have of one another, including high judges. The story delineates the lives of these judges. They represent the power of authority they hold on life or the power of life itself. But they lead a sensuous life. They have no sense of human relations.

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