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MonkeyNotes-Troilus and Cressida by William Shakespeare
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Notes

Hector’s modes of addressing Troilus as ‘young Troilus’, ‘brave boy’, are meant primarily as dramatic irony since he has not watched as the audience has, the painful scene in which Troilus matures emotionally. But these fond addresses may also reflect on the violence which Troilus advocates in the next few lines.

Troilus’ repudiation of any ‘vice of mercy’ frightens Hector, who calls him ‘savage.’ It is obviously the result of Troilus’ complete disillusionment with Cressida, whose letter is contemptuously dismissed as ‘Words, words, mere words.’


One of the quick succession of brief scenes that conclude the play, this one hastily brings together the various strands of the action: it shows the way to the total collapse of Trojan idealism and hope of survival as well as the temporary triumph of Grecian brutality and purpose.

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