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MonkeyNotes-The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare
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Act II, SceneS 2 - 3

No longer pretending indifference towards Proteus, Julia bids him a mournful farewell. They exchange rings sealed with a "holy kiss", in remembrance of each other. Both vow constancy in love; then Proteus makes his sorrowful leave, fighting back his tears. As he travels to Milan by boat, he is to be accompanied by his servant, Launce. When it is time for Launce to leave, he grieves because his dog Crab refuses to cry over his master's departure. Launce wildly complains over the faithless Crab, saying that "did not this cruel- hearted cur shed one tear;" the servant's sentimentality and the dog's indifference add great humor to the play.


Notes

Scenes two and three of Act Two are both farewell scenes. By juxtaposing two contrasting scenes that evoke opposite human emotions of love and despair, Shakespeare reveals his true genius. The farewell scene at Julia's house, with the exchange of vows of constancy in love, the exchange of rings, and a tide of tears, is serious and touching as it epitomizes true and innocent love. The scene on the street between Launce and his dog is totally humorous. Crab is definitely the "sourest-natured dog that lives" because of his total indifference to the departure of his master, who gushes over the animal with exaggerated sentimentality.

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MonkeyNotes-The Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare
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