free booknotes online

Help / FAQ




<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Ulysses by James Joyce
Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version

The barroom setting, the flirtations with the bar-maids, the genial confusion and the wealth of witty conversation accurately catch the gay and hectic atmosphere of a Dublin tavern. The universally sentimental response to the songs touchingly represents the unifying force of the pathetic in Irish song and legend. Bloom, we may notice, leaves while the others are transfixed. The characters incongruously gathered around the piano find, in music, some inner harmony and beauty in the midst of their oppressively drab lives. At the height of Ban Dollardís fine song, Miss Douce and Bloom exchange meaningful glances in the mirror. After Bloom leaves the bar, he encounters a wretched street-walker and recognizes her with momentary horror.


"Sirens" is the chapter in which the possibility of renewed communion is recognized. What has been separate starts towards convergence: Stephen and humanity, Bloom and Molly. The much-argued musical form of the prelude can be viewed as the first symbol of this convergence in the chapter. Bloom recognizes his inevitable paternal role ("kismet, Fate"), as he moves toward a new harmony. The fragments are drawn together into a cohesive pattern. In this we comprehend precisely the coherence of inner and outer music. The music of the blood sounds as a sea ever renewed in a shell. It is like a Hebraic melody chanted from father to son, or in the silence of love.

Table of Contents | Message Board | Printable Version


<- Previous Page | First Page | Next Page ->
MonkeyNotes-Ulysses by James Joyce
Google
Web
PinkMonkey

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   

All Contents Copyright © PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 5/9/2017 9:53:43 AM