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MonkeyNotes-Utopia by Sir Thomas More
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MOOD

The mood of the first book of Utopia is one of debate and reasoning as well as social critique. Hythloday cannot stand the inequalities and injustices of contemporary England and Europe and reveals possibilities for reform using his example of a Utopia society. Yet he insists that his type of knowledge would not be heeded in a society that only looks out for those who have money and power rather than the majority who have nothing. Hythloday condemns the numerous laws in England that do nothing to promulgate justice. He is angry at the gap between the rich and the poor. He sneers at a society that has so many unemployed men who are left to steal and beg for food.


In the second book, reforms for these inequalities are offered. Some are very sensible while others are extremely extravagant. The second book is more explicit about creating a society that provides for all. There is admiration for this society. The critique and scorn of the first book is offset by the calm assurance of the second. The book ends on a note of hope.

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