Support the Monkey! Tell All your Friends and Teachers

Help / FAQ




PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

Don Quixote

By Miguel de Cervantes QUOTATION: The Knight of the Doleful Countenance.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish author. Don Quixote, pt. 1, ch. 19 and passim (1605).

QUOTATION: Every man is the son of his own works.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 1, ch. 4, trans. by P. Motteux (1605).

QUOTATION: Mere flim-flam stories, and nothing but shams and lies.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 3, ch. 11 (1605), trans. by P. Motteux.

QUOTATION: Our greatest foes, and whom we must chiefly combat, are within.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 5, ch. 8, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

QUOTATION: A private sin is not so prejudicial in this world, as a public indecency.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish author. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, ch. 22 (1615), trans. by P. Motteux.

QUOTATION: There is nothing so subject to the inconstancy of fortune as war.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 1, ch. 8 (1605), trans. by P. Motteux.

QUOTATION: Delay always breeds danger; and to protract a great design is often to ruin it.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 4, ch. 2, trans by P. Motteux (1605).

QUOTATION: I do not say a proverb is amiss when aptly and reasonably applied, but to be forever discharging them, right or wrong, hit or miss, renders conversation insipid and vulgar.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish author. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, ch. 43 (1615).

QUOTATION: Modesty, ‘tis a virtue not often found among poets, for almost every one of them thinks himself the greatest in the world.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 5, ch. 18, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

QUOTATION: When the severity of the law is to be softened, let pity, not bribes, be the motive.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Don Quixote’s advice to Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 6, ch. 9, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

QUOTATION: Virtue is the truest nobility.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Trans. by P. Motteux. Dorothea, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 4, ch. 9 (1605).

QUOTATION: What I say is, patience, and shuffle the cards.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish author. Durandarte, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, ch. 23 (1615), trans. by P. Motteux.

QUOTATION: A closed mouth catches no flies.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Trans. by P. Motteux. Italian proverb quoted by Sancho Panza in Don Quixote, bk. 3, ch. 11, pt. 1 (1605).

QUOTATION: ‘Tis said of love that it sometimes goes, sometimes flies; runs with one, walks gravely with another; turns a third into ice, and sets a fourth in a flame: it wounds one, another it kills: like lightning it begins and ends in the same moment: it makes that fort yield at night which it besieged but in the morning; for there is no force able to resist it.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Leonela, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, bk. 4, ch. 7, trans. by P. Motteux (1605).

QUOTATION: He ... had a face like a blessing.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish author. Peter, in Don Quixote, pt. 1, ch. 4 (1605), trans. by P. Motteux.

QUOTATION: There’s no taking trout with dry breeches.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Sancho, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, ch. 71, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

QUOTATION: ‘Tis a dainty thing to command, though ‘twere but a flock of sheep.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 6, ch. 9, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

QUOTATION: Death eats up all things, both the young lamb and old sheep; and I have heard our parson say, death values a prince no more than a clown; all’s fish that comes to his net; he throws at all, and sweeps stakes; he’s no mower that takes a nap at noon- day, but drives on, fair weather or foul, and cuts down the green grass as well as the ripe corn: he’s neither squeamish nor queesy-stomach’d, for he swallows without chewing, and crams down all things into his ungracious maw; and tho’ you can see no belly he has, he has a confounded dropsy, and thirsts after men’s lives, which he guggles down like mother’s milk.
ATTRIBUTION: Miguel De Cervantes (1547–1616), Spanish writer. Sancho Panza, in Don Quixote, pt. 2, bk. 5, ch. 20, trans. by P. Motteux (1615).

Google
  Web PinkMonkey.com   
Google
  Web Search Our Message Boards   

All Contents Copyright © 1997-2004 PinkMonkey.com
All rights reserved. Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.


About Us
 | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page
This page was last updated: 10/16/2003 12:49:15 PM