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PinkMonkey.com-MonkeyNotes-Diary of a Young Girl, by Anne Frank


PinkMonkey® Quotations on . . .

Diary of a Young Girl

By Anne Frank QUOTATION: I don’t believe that the big men, the politicians and the capitalists alone are guilty of the war. Oh, no, the little man is just as keen, otherwise the people of the world would have risen in revolt long ago! There is an urge and rage in people to destroy, to kill, to murder, and until all mankind, without exception, undergoes a great change, wars will be waged, everything that has been built up, cultivated and grown, will be destroyed and disfigured, after which mankind will have to begin all over again.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for May 3, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: They mustn’t know my despair, I can’t let them see the wounds which they have caused, I couldn’t bear their sympathy and their kind-hearted jokes, it would only make me want to scream all the more. If I talk, everyone thinks I’m showing off; when I’m silent they think I’m ridiculous; rude if I answer, sly if I get a good idea, lazy if I’m tired, selfish if I eat a mouthful more than I should, stupid, cowardly, crafty, etc. etc.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, journal entry for January 30, 1943 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: Chanuka and St. Nicholas Day came almost together this year—just one day’s difference. We didn’t make much fuss about Chanuka: we just gave each other a few little presents and then we had the candles. Because of the shortage of candles we only had them alight for ten minutes, but it is all right as long as you have the song.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for Dec. 7, 1942 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: The best remedy for those who are afraid, lonely or unhappy is to go outside, somewhere where they can be quiet, alone with the heavens, nature and God. Because only then does one feel that all is as it should be and that God wishes to see people happy, amidst the simple beauty of nature. As long as this exists, and it certainly always will, I know that then there will always be comfort for every sorrow, whatever the circumstances may be. And I firmly believe that nature brings solace in all troubles.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German-Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for Feb. 23, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: I have often been downcast, but never in despair; I regard our hiding as a dangerous adventure, romantic and interesting at the same time. In my diary I treat all the privations as amusing. I have made up my mind now to lead a different life from other girls and, later on, different from ordinary housewives. My start has been so very full of interest, and that is the sole reason why I have to laugh at the humorous side of the most dangerous moments.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for May 3, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: Is discord going to show itself while we are still fighting, is the Jew once again worth less than another? Oh, it is sad, very sad, that once more, for the umpteenth time, the old truth is confirmed: “What one Christian does is his own responsibility, what one Jew does is thrown back at all Jews.”
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for May 22, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: Bolkenstein, a Minister, was speaking on the Dutch programme from London, and he said that they ought to make a collection of diaries and letters after the war. Of course, they all made a rush at my diary immediately. Just imagine how interesting it would be if I were to publish a romance of the “Secret Annexe.” The title alone would be enough to make people think it was a detective story.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. Entry for March 29, 1944. The Diary of a Young Girl (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: And finally I twist my heart round again, so that the bad is on the outside and the good is on the inside, and keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would so like to be, and could be, if ... there weren’t any other people living in the world.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, last words of last entry, Aug. 1, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: Mrs. Van Daan’s grizzling is absolutely unbearable; now she can’t any longer drive us crazy over the invasion, she nags us the whole day long about the bad weather. It really would be nice to dump her in a bucket of cold water and put her up in the loft.
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German-Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for June 9, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

QUOTATION: The radio ... goes on early in the morning and is listened to at all hours of the day, until nine, ten and often eleven o’clock in the evening. This is certainly a sign that the grown-ups have infinite patience, but it also means that the power of absorption of their brains is pretty limited, with exceptions, of course—I don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings. One or two news bulletins would be ample per day! But the old geese, well—I’ve said my piece!
ATTRIBUTION: Anne Frank (1929–1945), German Jewish refugee, diarist. The Diary of a Young Girl, entry for March 27, 1944 (1947, trans. 1952).

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