Support the Monkey! Tell All your Friends and Teachers

Help / FAQ



<- Previous | Table of Contents | Next ->
PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen


137

whether there were much admiration in it, and sometimes it
seemed nothing but absence of mind.

She had once or twice suggested to Elizabeth the possibility of his
being partial to her, but Elizabeth always laughed at the idea; and
Mrs. Collins did not think it right to press the subject, from the
danger of raising expectations which might only end in
disappointment; for in her opinion it admitted not of a doubt, that
all her friendís dislike would vanish, if she could suppose him to
be in her power.

In her kind schemes for Elizabeth, she sometimes planned her
marrying Colonel Fitzwilliam. He was beyond comparison the
pleasantest man; he certainly ad-
mired her, and his situation in life was most eligible; but, to
counterbalance these advantages, Mr. Darcy had considerable
patronage in the church, and his cousin could have none at all.
<- Previous | Table of Contents | Next ->
PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen



All Contents Copyright © All rights reserved.
Further Distribution Is Strictly Prohibited.

About Us | Advertising | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Home Page


Search:
Keywords:
In Association with Amazon.com