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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


never to be seen in this world by my eyes again!

'Dear, if your heart is hard towards me - justly hard, I know -
but, listen, if it is hard, dear, ask him I have wronged the most
- him whose wife I was to have been - before you quite decide
against my poor poor prayer! If he should be so compassionate as
to say that you might write something for me to read - I think he
would, oh, I think he would, if you would only ask him, for he
always was so brave and so forgiving - tell him then (but not
else), that when I hear the wind blowing at night, I feel as if it
was passing angrily from seeing him and uncle, and was going up to
God against me. Tell him that if I was to die tomorrow (and oh, if
I was fit, I would be so glad to die!) I would bless him and uncle
with my last words, and pray for his happy home with my last
breath!'

Some money was enclosed in this letter also. Five pounds. It was
untouched like the previous sum, and he refolded it in the same
way. Detailed instructions were added relative to the address of
a reply, which, although they betrayed the intervention of several
hands, and made it difficult to arrive at any very probable
conclusion in reference to her place of concealment, made it at
least not unlikely that she had written from that spot where she
was stated to have been seen.

'What answer was sent?' I inquired of Mr. Peggotty.

'Missis Gummidge,' he returned, 'not being a good scholar, sir, Ham
kindly drawed it out, and she made a copy on it. They told her I
was gone to seek her, and what my parting words was.'

'Is that another letter in your hand?' said I.

'It's money, sir,' said Mr. Peggotty, unfolding it a little way.
'Ten pound, you see. And wrote inside, "From a true friend," like
the fust. But the fust was put underneath the door, and this come
by the post, day afore yesterday. I'm a-going to seek her at the
post-mark.'

He showed it to me. It was a town on the Upper Rhine. He had
found out, at Yarmouth, some foreign dealers who knew that country,
and they had drawn him a rude map on paper, which he could very
well understand. He laid it between us on the table; and, with his
chin resting on one hand, tracked his course upon it with the
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