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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-David Copperfield by Charles Dickens


Remonstrance was of no use, then; so I laughed, and admired, and
was very much in love and very happy; and she showed me Jip's new
trick of standing on his hind legs in a corner - which he did for
about the space of a flash of lightning, and then fell down - and
I don't know how long I should have stayed there, oblivious of
Traddles, if Miss Lavinia had not come in to take me away. Miss
Lavinia was very fond of Dora (she told me Dora was exactly like
what she had been herself at her age - she must have altered a good
deal), and she treated Dora just as if she had been a toy. I
wanted to persuade Dora to come and see Traddles, but on my
proposing it she ran off to her own room and locked herself in; so
I went to Traddles without her, and walked away with him on air.

'Nothing could be more satisfactory,' said Traddles; 'and they are
very agreeable old ladies, I am sure. I shouldn't be at all
surprised if you were to be married years before me, Copperfield.'

'Does your Sophy play on any instrument, Traddles?' I inquired, in
the pride of my heart.

'She knows enough of the piano to teach it to her little sisters,'
said Traddles.

'Does she sing at all?' I asked.

'Why, she sings ballads, sometimes, to freshen up the others a
little when they're out of spirits,' said Traddles. 'Nothing
scientific.'

'She doesn't sing to the guitar?' said I.

'Oh dear no!' said Traddles.

'Paint at all?'

'Not at all,' said Traddles.

I promised Traddles that he should hear Dora sing, and see some of
her flower-painting. He said he should like it very much, and we
went home arm in arm in great good humour and delight. I
encouraged him to talk about Sophy, on the way; which he did with
a loving reliance on her that I very much admired. I compared her
in my mind with Dora, with considerable inward satisfaction; but I
candidly admitted to myself that she seemed to be an excellent kind
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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-David Copperfield by Charles Dickens



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