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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-Walden by Henry David Thoreau


Man was born. Whether that Artificer of things, The origin of a
better world, made him from the divine seed; Or the earth, being
recent and lately sundered from the high Ether, retained some seeds
of cognate heaven."

A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener. So our
prospects brighten on the influx of better thoughts. We should be
blessed if we lived in the present always, and took advantage of
every accident that befell us, like the grass which confesses the
influence of the slightest dew that falls on it; and did not spend our
time in atoning for the neglect of past opportunities, which we call
doing our duty. We loiter in winter while it is already spring. In a
pleasant spring morning all menís sins are forgiven. Such a day is a
truce to vice. While such a sun holds out to burn, the vilest sinner
may return. Through our own recovered innocence we discern the
innocence of our neighbors. You may have known your neighbor
yesterday for a thief, a drunkard, or a sensualist, and merely pitied or
despised him, and despaired of the world; but the sun shines bright
and warm this first spring morning, re-creating the world, and you
meet him at some serene work, and see how it is exhausted and
debauched veins expand with still joy and bless the new day, feel the
spring influence with the innocence of infancy, and all his faults are
forgotten. There is not only an atmosphere of good will about him,
but even a savor of holiness groping for expression, blindly and
ineffectually perhaps, like a new-born instinct, and for a short hour
the south hillside echoes to no vulgar jest. You see some innocent
fair shoots preparing to burst from his gnarled rind and try another
yearís life, tender and fresh as the youngest plant. Even he has
entered into the joy of his Lord. Why the jailer does not leave open
his prison doors-why the judge does not dismis his case-why the
preacher does not dismiss his congregation! It is because they do not
obey the hint which God gives them, nor accept the pardon which he
freely offers to all.

"A return to goodness produced each day in the tranquil and
beneficent breath of the morning, causes that in respect to the love of
virtue and the hatred of vice, one approaches a little the primitive
nature of man, as the sprouts of the forest which has been felled. In
like manner the evil which one does in the interval of a day prevents
the germs of virtues which began to spring up again from developing
themselves and destroys them.

"After the germs of virtue have thus been prevented many times
from developing themselves, then the beneficent breath of evening
does not suffice to preserve them. As soon as the breath of evening
does not suffice longer to preserve them, then the nature of man does
not differ much from that of the brute. Men seeing the nature of this
man like that of the brute, think that he has never possessed the
innate faculty of reason. Are those the true and natural sentiments of
man?"

"The Golden Age was first created, which without any avenger
Spontaneously without law cherished fidelity and rectitude.

Punishment and fear were not; nor were threatening words read On
suspended brass; nor did the suppliant crowd fear The words of their
judge; but were safe without an avenger. Not yet the pine felled on
its mountains had descended To the liquid waves that it might see a
foreign world, And mortals knew no shores but their own.

There was eternal spring, and placid zephyrs with warm Blasts
soothed the flowers born without seed."

On the 29th of April, as I was fishing from the bank of the river near
the Nine-Acre-Corner bridge, standing on the quaking grass and
willow roots, where the muskrats lurk, I heard a singular rattling
sound, somewhat like that of the sticks which boys play with their
fingers, when, looking up, I observed a very slight and graceful
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PinkMonkey.com Digital Library - PinkMonkey.com-Walden by Henry David Thoreau



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